Allergy / Asthma

Allergies: Disease in Disguise : How to Heal Your Allergic Condition Permanently and Naturallyย “Allergy is generally misunderstood. Left untreated it can lead to serious degenerative disease. Asthma, migraines, arthritis, ulcers and obesity have all been linked to allergy. Fatigue, irritability, body aching, digestive problems, and other vague ailments are typical of allergy. Dr. Carolee Bateson-Koch provides insight into why allergy is becoming more common, how it relates to environmental factors, food additives, diet, digestion, body chemistry, addiction, yeast, molds, parasites and childhood illnesses – and why enzymes are the key to healing. Following her program, you won’t have to give up your pet, get allergy shots, rotate foods, keep diet diaries or cook allergy-free recipes for the rest of your life. You will not only recover and enjoy an allergy-free life, you will gain invaluable understanding of health and well-being.”

WildEdiblePlantFoods Using the book, Wild Edible Plants: A North American Field Guide to Over 200 Natural Foods, by Thomas Elias & Peter Dykeman, to safely eat wild flowers and pollen I acclimated my body to pollen and thereby eliminated my seasonal pollen allergy. I eat whole wild flowers from my yard including their pollen. You can eat whole flowers or you buy flower pollen which they call “bee pollen“. When bees collect nectar from flowers (to make honey) the flower pollen sticks to their legs and rubs off on other flowers which pollinates them to produce fruit and/or seeds. When bees fly into their nest the flower pollen gets rubbed off of their legs at the opening (doorway) of the nest and bee farmers collect it and sell it with the name “bee pollen” but it is really flower pollen.

811The 80/10/10 Diet: Balancing Your Health, Your Weight, and Your Life One Luscious Bite at a Time by Dr. Douglas Graham. If you have struggled with maintaining your natural weight and wellness or would like to change your life for the better, look no further than this groundbreaking book. Dr. Douglas Graham gives “voice to what has proven to be the healthiest choice in the world of food and nutrition” and says, “I believe it is time that we all started loving ourselves a lot more … by nourishing our bodies with foods that love us back.” He addresses heart-disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity, adrenal fatigue, candida, depression, pain, and more with a simple formula macro-nutrient ratio of 80% minimum carbohydrates, 10% maximum protein, and 10% maximum fat.

More Resources:

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART00306/asthma.html

What therapies does Dr. Weil recommend for asthma?
For acute attacks, try lobelia, or Indian tobacco (Lobelia inflate). Mix three parts tincture of lobelia with one part tincture of capsicum (red pepper, cayenne pepper). Take twenty drops of the mixture in water at the start of an asthmatic attack. Repeat every thirty minutes for a total of three or four doses.

For long term control and prevention:

  • Decrease protein to 10 percent of daily caloric intake. Replace animal protein as much as possible with plant protein
  • Eliminate milk and milk products, substituting other calcium sources.
  • Eat organically grown fruits and vegetables as much as possible.
  • Eliminate polyunsaturated vegetable oils, margarine, vegetable shortening, all partially hydrogenated oils that might contain trans-fatty acids, all foods that might contain trans-fatty acids (such as deep-fried foods).
  • Use extra-virgin olive oil as your main fat.
  • Increase intake of omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Always drink plenty of water to keep your respiratory tract secretions more fluid.
  • Experiment with eliminating (one at a time) wheat, corn, soy and sugar for six to eight weeks to see if the condition improves.
  • Eat ginger and turmeric regularly for their anti-inflammatory effects.
  • Have some manipulative work done on the chest to break up restrictive patterns in nerves and muscles that develop in chronic asthma. The best systems I know for this are osteopathic manipulation, especially from a practitioner of cranial therapy, and Rolfing, a form of deep-tissue massage.
  • Minimize contact with respiratory irritants, such as smoke, dust, molds, and volatile chemicals. Remove sources of offending materials from your home, install a good air filtration system, or consider moving if the air is generally bad where you live. Experiment with living in other locations: in high mountains, the desert, or near the seacoast. Asthma may improve greatly with a change of climate.
  • In adults, GERD (acid reflux disease) may be an underlying cause of asthma. In such cases, successful treatment of the digestive problem will often clear up the asthma.
  • Experiment with traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine (the traditional healing system of India). These systems are sometimes able to offer significant help through more specific dietary adjustments and herbal treatments.

Here are some specific recommendations for exercise-induced asthma:

  1. Warm up very slowly to the point where you almost feel the “tightness” associated with exercise-induced asthma. Then stop and stretch or, if you’re exercising vigorously, slow down. By taking this break, you often can block the development of asthmatic symptoms. You can then go back to your normal pace. This may take some getting used to, but can sometimes eliminate the need for medication.
  2. Try breath work. The most effective approaches are pranayama techniques (breath control exercises taught in some yoga classes). You can do these after the initial warm-up when symptoms are almost felt. For beginners, start with “The Relaxing Breath,” a technique I describe in my books and on this Web site.
  3. Find a form of physical activity that minimizes your exercise-induced symptoms. Sports or activities that have intermittent rest periods (such as tennis, softball, and golf) can allow you to regain control of your breathing. Swimming may be better than running outdoors in cold weather, but no type of exercise is off-limits with proper treatment. In fact, some of the world’s top athletes have exercise-induced asthma, and they’re still able to compete successfully in Olympic-level events.

http://www.top10homeremedies.com/home-remedies/home-remedies-for-asthma.html

I have a friend who’s 60-ish year old wife had severe asthma and had taken many pharmaceutical medications for many years and then had a severe asthma attack and was told in the hospital there was nothing else they could do for her and sadly she died. So I think it’s wise to at least consider “alternatives”.